Hello Again – Bridge to Monet’s garden

Royal academy photo 1

What better way to spend a wintery Friday afternoon than taking a trip to the Royal Academy of Arts in London and seeing their current exhibition titled “Painting the Modern Garden: Monet to Matisse”.  We were bathed in the colourful paintings by artists impressions of garden landscapes and scenes, and bathed in vivid colours and lighting of some of the most famous artists of the mid-19th to the first two decades of the 20th Century.

Monet, who is arguably the most important painter of gardens in the history of art, once said he owed his painting “to flowers”. But Monet was far from alone in his fascination with the horticultural world, which is why we will also be bringing you masterpieces by Renoir, Cezanne, Pissarro, Manet, Sargent, Kandinsky, Van Gogh, Matisse, Klimt and Klee.

It had been over 20 years, when I was in Paris,  since I had been up so close to one of Monet’s water lilies painting and the Japanese bridge, and I so much had changed since then. Inside I felt like I was seeing an old acquaintance which took my right back to visitng the Tuileries Gardens of Paris and the Musée de l’Orangerie  of the 1980’s.

the-japanese-bridge-the-bridge-in-monet-s-garden-1896

The Royal Academy of arts has done an excellent job of bringing together all of these artists’ work many of whom were keen and accomplished gardeners. My visit was enhanced by the audio guide, with some great commentary on selected works (see video below).

The final exhibit and the most spectacular was the Water lillies murals, of which Monet painted 250. We were treated to a collection brought together from three private collection based in the US, all of which formerly belonging to Monet’s son.

The exhibition run’s until 20th April 2016.

WLA_moma_Reflections_of_Clouds_on_the_Water-Lily_Pond_Monet

Watch the exhibition trailer for ‘Painting the Modern Garden: Monet to Matisse’ from Royal Academy of Arts on Vimeo.

 

Share

Georgenahlis

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

one × five =